012 – Buddhism

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: In episode 12 of “The Heritage Podcast,” we journey in the footsteps of Siddhartha Gautama–or the Buddha–on his quest for spiritual awakening and enlightenment. Considering the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path, we discover what Buddhism and its major denominations have to say about life, suffering, and the nature of reality.

Comments (5)

  1. Megan

    Thank you so much for continuing to do this podcast! Although I already have my degree in history and religion, I am still finding this podcast extremely entertaining and a good refresher on many of the concepts I studied early in my education and may have forgotten as my studies become more specialized.

    Reply
    1. Will Webb (Post author)

      You’ve made my evening! Thanks for the thoughtful note!

      Reply
  2. James Beirne

    I’m working my way through the podcast in order and though I’m a bit late to the party for this episode I think I’ll still add my little piece. I’m a Buddhist practitioner and I wanted to clarify the Second Noble Truth a bit. Your overview was good, but possibly confusing to those experienced only in the Western tradition.

    Personally, I feel “clinging” is a good translation of what you’ve called “desire”. It’s not our desires in and of themselves that lead to suffering, it’s our determination that they be fulfilled. Imagine you have an ice cream, but just before you get to take a lick, you drop it. The disappointment is caused by your “clinging” to the idea of having the ice cream. Even if you do eat the ice cream, eventually it will be gone, and you’ll be disappointed by not having it anymore (or some other worldly pleasure in its place).

    Great episode (and podcast) though!

    Reply
    1. Will Webb (Post author)

      Thanks for the insight! I’ll give you a shout out in the next C&C.

      Reply
      1. James Beirne

        Oh sweet, thanks!

        Reply

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